BEOBIO Teoranta hand harvest seaweeds in optimum growth phases from the Irish Atlantic Ocean, and process in a HSE registered and organically certified food grade facility.

These seaweeds come in various formats including: Whole, Flaked, Powdered

Available species include:

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Laminaria digitata (Kombu)

Common names:

English: Oarweed, Kombu, Tangleweed, Sea girdle, Sea tangle, Sea ribbon

Gaeilge: Leathrach, Feamnach dhubh, Coirrleach

Description: Laminaria digiata is golden-brown in colour, up to 2.5 metres in length and 60 cm in width across the fond.

 

Laminaria digitata is a very common kelp found in low water around the Irish, North European and Eastern North American Coastlines. In clear water it can be found growing to a depth of 10m. Laminaria thrives in fairly exposed areas. 

Sustainable Harvesting Techniques: L.digitata is hand harvested during low tides. Sustainable harvesting practices involves cutting only the upper three-quarters of the frond by knife, leaving the stipe and lower part intact to encourage regrowth.

Uses:

L. digitata is used as a Sea vegetable in many countries. It also forms the basis of the alginate industry and had been widely used as a soil fertilizer/biostimulant by commercials or domestice gardeners alike. High in iodine, it is also used in health supplements for over active thyroids and for the treatment of goitre.

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Laminaria saccharina (Sweet Kombu)

Common names:

English: Sweet kombu, Kombu royale, Sugar kelp. Sugar wrack, Sea belt, Sea tangle, Oarweed, Poor man's weatherglass.

Gaeilge: Cupóg na gCloch, Lásaí, Rufaá, Fruill, Réabán, Madraí, Madraí rua, Coirrleach

Description: Laminaria saccharina is yellow-brown in colour and is easily recognisable by its relatively short stipe and the elongated frilly-edged, crinkled fronds that extend tounge-like to 2-4 metres in length.

 

L. saccharina is a common kelp of the lower shore in north Atlantic and Pacific. In Ireland this kelp is present in a range of habitats, ranging from outer reaches of estuaries to gently sloping semi-exposed rock shores.

Sustainable Harvesting Techniques: L.saccharina is hand harvested during low tides. Sustainable harvesting practices involves cutting only the upper three-quarters of the frond by knife, leaving the stipe and lower part intact to encourage regrowth.

Uses: L. saccharina has been used as a fertilizer in many coastal areas. Small quantities are also harvested for use as a sea vegetable. In dried format it is sold as Sweet kombu or Kombu royale. it is arguably one of the most palatable of the kelps due to the presence of mannitol, imparting a sweet taste.

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Ascophyllum nodosum

Common names:

English: Knotted wrack, Asco, Rockweed, Yellow weed, Sea whistle, Yellow tang

Gaeilge: Feamainn bhuí, Feamainn bhuí bhoilgíneach

Description: Ascophyllum nodosum is olive green in colour, turning dark green/brown when dried. It generally grows up to 2 metres in length and has long, touch, leathery elastic, slender, strap-like fronds. The basal disc supports numerous basal fronds, often more than 50.Along the middle of the main fronds are egg-shaped bladders, which contain gas. Bright yellow Asco is specifically associated with Connemara.

A. nodosum is a seaweed that is common wrack found in the middle-shore in Europe and the Atlantic coast of North America. It is generally found growing on rocks, larger stones, piers and on other solid objects in bays. This seaweed species is particularly abundant in Connemara, where is has dense beds. When submerged it floats due to its air bladders.

Sustainable Harvesting: At least 15 - 25cm of the base of the plant are left attached to the shore. Regeneration of the resource is ensured by allowing 3 to 5 years between harvests of the same area.

Uses: A. nodosum is used as a seaweed meal for the extraction of alginates. Horticulturists, gardeners, organic farmers and fruit growers are increasingly using both dried Asco meal and and liquid Asco biostimulants in soil conditioning and crop spray applications.  

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Fucus vesiculosus

Common names:

English: Knotted wrack, Asco, Rockweed, Yellow weed, Sea whistle, Yellow tang

Gaeilge: Feamainn bhuí, Feamainn bhuí bhoilgíneach

Description: Fucus vesiculosus is olive brown in colour, drying to a greenish black colour. In Connemara bright yellow F. vesiculosus can be found. It grows up to 60 - 80cm in length. It has a short thick stipe, and a strong, lobed, wavy edged frond. On either side of the midrib there are oval gas-filled bladders, which float the seaweed to the waters surface. F. vesiculosus is a very common seaweed found in the North Atlantic basin. It can be found in both exposed and sheltered environments along the Irish Atlantic Coast.

Sustainable Harvesting: Either hand harvested or collected as drift. When hand harvested at least 15 - 25cm of the base of the plant are left attached to the shore. Regeneration of the resource is ensured by allowing 3 to 5 years between harvests of the same area. 

Uses: F. vesiculosus has been used as a fertilizer/biostimulant and as an active ingredient in body care and seaweed baths. Many body creams, shower gels etc. contain a small amount of f. vesiculosus as an active ingredient. It is also used to a larger degree in health supplements such as kelp tablets. F. vesiculosus has been found to be beneficial for healthy skin, assist in the lowering of blood pressure and ease arthritis associated pain. The highly bioactive compound, fucoidan, can be extracted from Fucus vesiculosus. This ingredient in available in Ireland from Nutramara Ltd.